Google’s plan to buy Fitbit is running into a wall of antitrust and privacy concerns in the US, Europe and Australia, where competition officials are increasingly wary of how internet giants can exert control over data.

Google's purchase of fitness tracker Fitbit may be a "game-changer" for health data requiring close oversight from the European Union, consumer advocates said.

Reviewing how data from Fitbit could contribute to Google's powerful online advertisement position makes the deal a test case for regulators, said BEUC, which represents consumer organizations across Europe. This claims that wearables build a new frontier by monitoring the safety and location of users around the clock.

"The use of data from wearables is a timely example of this in monitoring Covid-19 infections and providing access to doctors and health information," BEUC said Wednesday. The takeover would put Google "in an unassailable spot on the wearables and digital health markets."

Google's bid to buy Fitbit is running into a wall of antitrust and privacy issues in the United States, Europe and Australia, where competition regulators are increasingly wary of how Internet companies will exert influence over data. The deal advances Google's parent Alphabet Inc's plans to grow in the health-care sector by incorporating data from over 28 million users of Fitbit.